Dissertation on Constant's influence on the modern city and architecture

Trudy Nieuwenhuys, Ludo van Halem and Yoshikazu Nango

F.l.t.r. Trudy Nieuwenhuys, Ludo van Halem and Yoshikazu Nango

F.l.t.r. Trudy Nieuwenhuys and Yoshikazu Nango

F.l.t.r. Trudy Nieuwenhuys and Yoshikazu Nango in front of Le Baiser (1999)

On March 11 and 20 Yoshikazu Nango, a Japanese scholar from the Meiji University in Tokyo, interviewed mrs Nieuwenhuys and Ludo van Halem for his dissertation about the influence of Constant on the modern city and architecture.
As sociologist mr Nango studies Theory of Urbanism and Architecture and wrote several papers on Constant voor Tokyo University and Japanese magazines. He will visit the Netherlands several times in the near future for more interviews and to see the collection.

According to his own words mr Nango was initially interested in the French philosopher and sociologist Henri Lefebvre.
"It was through the work of Lefebvre that I learned of Constant. His dynamic work was a mixed art of several disciplines like sociology, urbanism and architecture. In Japan we're familiar with Guy Debord and the Situationists but it was Constant that inspired me. I saw many opportunities in his work because he foretold globalization of cities and the information age in New Babylon.
I think that the Japanese can learn a lot from him in relation to the reconstruction of the areas that have been destroyed by the Tsunami three years ago. Constant's work is based on the viewpoint of the end users and not on the viewpoint of the architect. His work also consistent with the trend of 'Personal Fabrication' (Fab lab is a co-operative workplace where inventors and developers work together). I appreciate the beauty in his paintings, drawings, lithographs, models and maps. It's really interesting that he represents cities and buildings through different media."